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Netflix Zip Code Credit Card Problem !NEW!


The credit card trick works in this way. You enter in your normal Australian credit card (an American Express card is highly recommended), but for the post code, you have to construct one from your own post code - simply add a '0' (zero) to the end of your Australian post code (or add a '1' to the front), and then check this website to see if it corresponds to a valid US ZIP code. If it doesn't, then try a different number at the end until you get one that does. If none works, then use the time-tested '90210' (but it's usually better if it's based on your real post code). One additional consideration when choosing a ZIP code is that some U.S. states have sales tax. The following states don't have sales tax: Alaska, Delaware, Montana, New Hampshire and Oregon - and so you may want to choose a ZIP code from one of these states, if you don't decide to use a ZIP code based on your actual post code.




Netflix Zip Code Credit Card Problem



If your credit card was accepted, you should now be able to finish your sign-up process. If it didn't work, and trying other post codes didn't work either, you may need to sign up to a EntroPay virtual credit card. This is a pre-paid VISA card, where you refill the card with money before use, but it works with Netflix signups and that's all that matters. If this is what you need, go on to Step 2a, otherwise skip to Step 3.


Warning: In our testing, we found that on one occasion, using our credit card to sign up resulted in the card being temporarily suspended for "unauthorised usage", haha. A quick call to the bank un-flagged the transaction, and we were able to proceed. So just be aware that if you're with a good bank that is doing what it's supposed to do, you might run into this problem. Using an American Expressed issued card (as opposed to a bank issued one) may avoid this problem. You've been warned!


So basically, all you have to do now, is press the signup link on the Netflix site and fill in your payment info. Your only problem is that you do actually have to provide a US based Zip code and State. If you want to save some more dollars, use a state that does not add any sales taxes. Some examples are :


The above method does not work for everybody, some cards are still rejected by Netflix. Your workaround is to go to Payoneer signup and get a card. Payoneer is a globally used card based in the USA, it is used by the biggest online vendors and freelance communities. I personally own one for my freelance work. You can also purchase it as a gift card and top it up as you please. Once you have signed up and provided the needed paperwork, you will still need to activate the card, the problem here is that it takes a few weeks for the card to arrive. Payoneer is my favorite alternative as you get a physical card that you can use in stores and on vacations. If you do not wish to wait for the card to arrive. Please see alternative B below. Note: You still have to pull the ZIP code trick to get the US Netflix trial.


Your bank may now require strong customer authentication (SCA) when using a credit or debit card online. SCA can be a pass code sent via text or email, a security question or redirection to your bank's website.


Many providers of DNS proxy services will advertise the ability to watch Netflix and other streaming sites. Indeed, as long as the IP address they provide isn\u2019t blocked by Netflix, then you\u2019ll be able to gain access and enjoy streaming shows and movies.\nHowever, the major problem is that it\u2019s very easy for Netflix to block DNS proxies, so they end up being very unreliable. They also tend to have fewer countries available, so you have less chance of finding the library you want. One proxy that doesn\u2019t suffer from these issues is ExpressVPN's MediaStreamer DNS service, which is included in every subscription. It's used by default when you connect to the VPN but can also be configured separately.\nMore importantly for some, a DNS proxy does not encrypt your traffic, so your activity is open to your ISP and anyone else who might be snooping. Plus these services are often free, and in the same vein as a free VPN service, they may be collecting and selling your information, injecting annoying ads, or using other shady or invasive practices.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Aimee O'Driscoll","description":"Aimee is a tech and cybersecurity editor with a focus on consumer privacy and security. She has written for a number of security and tech publications including Security Today and IoT for All. At Comparitech, Aimee covers a range of topics, including digital privacy, online security, VPNs, security software, and cybersecurity education and careers. She is dedicated to providing thorough yet easily digestible information that resonates with fellow lovers of everything digital.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/aimee\/"}},"@type":"Question","name":"Does Netflix allow VPNs to access content?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"As mentioned earlier, Netflix has cracked down on allowing subscribers to watch content through a VPN. If an IP address is known to come from a VPN server, traffic from that IP address will be blocked and you\u2019ll see a proxy error. This means that with some VPN providers, you\u2019ll be locked out even if you connect through a server in the country you\u2019re in, simply for the fact you\u2019re using a VPN.\nThis practice seems illogical from a business perspective as it doesn\u2019t really do Netflix any favors and is frustrating to viewers. However, it is understandable when you consider the content licensing restrictions that Netflix has to abide by. These restrictions mean that the company isn\u2019t allowed to show its entire library in every geographical location. Without these constraints, Netflix could feasibly be the same anywhere.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Aimee O'Driscoll","description":"Aimee is a tech and cybersecurity editor with a focus on consumer privacy and security. She has written for a number of security and tech publications including Security Today and IoT for All. At Comparitech, Aimee covers a range of topics, including digital privacy, online security, VPNs, security software, and cybersecurity education and careers. She is dedicated to providing thorough yet easily digestible information that resonates with fellow lovers of everything digital.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/aimee\/","@type":"Question","name":"How do I change my Netflix billing country?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"If you want to change your Netflix billing country, you actually need to close your account and then restart it in your new country. Assuming you\u2019re relocating, you\u2019ll want to be billed in the currency that corresponds to your new location. To do this, wait until your current billing period is up and cancel your account. Then, restart your account in the new location.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Aimee O'Driscoll","description":"Aimee is a tech and cybersecurity editor with a focus on consumer privacy and security. She has written for a number of security and tech publications including Security Today and IoT for All. At Comparitech, Aimee covers a range of topics, including digital privacy, online security, VPNs, security software, and cybersecurity education and careers. She is dedicated to providing thorough yet easily digestible information that resonates with fellow lovers of everything digital.\n","url":"https:\/\/w